Joint Injections

Self Pay Services
View procedure prices   Make an enquiry   or call us on: 01206 987525

Procedure Waiting Times

Location:

Tollgate Clinic, Colchester

Waiting Times (April 2018)

2 Weeks

Location:

North Road Primary Care Centre, Westcliff-on-Sea

Waiting Times (April 2018)

2 - 4 weeks

Location:

St James Surgery, Clacton

Waiting Times (April 2018)

Overview

Local Steroid Injections

We offer steroid injections for a painful joint, trigger finger, heel and other sites.

Some steroids occur naturally in the human body. Man- made steroids act like natural steroids to reduce inflammation.  They can be given as a tablet or an injection.

A steroid mixture can be injected around a joint to reduce inflammation and pain. It is known as a local injection because it works on a particular area of the body.

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Conditions that we offer treatment for include:

  • Hand: Trigger Finder
  • Elbow: Tennis, Golfers Elbow
  • Shoulder: Frozen Shoulder, Impingement, Arthritis
  • Hip: Greater Trochanteric Bursitis
  • Knees: Arthritis
  • Foot: Plantar Fasciitis

 

Self Pay Prices

Consultation Price (from)*
Joint Injections The minimum appointment duration for a steriod injection is 15 minutes which is charged at £200. Appointment duration can vary depending on the type of injection required. Please contact us for further information.

*Prices dependant on the individual patients needs, prices from provide an overview of potential costs and is not an exact figure, as all patients' requirements are different.

Clinicians

Location:

North Road Primary Care Centre, Westcliff-on-Sea

Location:

St James Surgery, Clacton

FAQs

Why are steroid injections given?

Steroid injections are given when there is localised inflammation and pain, with treatment being targeted to the specific area of inflammation. This reduces the risk of side effects to the steroid.  Steroid injections are often used to treat frozen shoulder, shoulder impingement, tennis or golfer’s elbow, bursitis of the hip or knee and a number of other musculoskeletal conditions.

What should I do after having a steroid injection?

Having had a steroid injection you should try to rest for the first 1-2 days, if this is not possible you should avoid strenuous exercise for the first 1-2 days post treatment

How long do steroid injections take to work?

Depending on the type of steroid this can vary from a few hours to approximately 1 week. Some steroids are combined with a local anaesthetic in which case symptoms of pain should start to reduce within a few minutes. The local anaesthetic is given to reduce the pain of injection and does not have any anti-inflammatory properties.

What are the possible side effects of a steroid injection?

Side effects are uncommon but are more likely with strong or high dose steroid injections. Joint pain may flare after a steroid injection but this usually settles after 1-2 days.

Infection is a rare but potential risk at the site of injection, should you develop increasing pain with redness or swelling of the joint post injection you should seek medical advice.

Rarely steroids particularly if given on a regular basis can cause thinning of the skin over the injection site or if given into a muscle can cause dimpling of the skin at the injection site.

Steroid injections can make you feel flushed, affect your menstrual cycle and mood for the first 1-2 days after the procedure, again this is rare and symptoms tend to settle quickly post procedure.

If you are diabetic it is usual to see a rise in blood glucose for 1-2 days post steroid injection.

Can I drink Alcohol after a steroid injection?

There is no reason to avoid alcohol consumption in moderation after a steroid injection.

 

 

Do I need any special checks prior to a steroid injection?

People who are diabetic or known to have a raised blood pressure should ensure their diabetes and blood pressure are well controlled prior to having a steroid injection.

Can I take other medicines when I have a steroid injection?

Generally it is safe to have your regular medication and a steroid injection. Those who are on blood thinning drugs such as warfarin or some of the newer anticoagulants may not be good candidates for a steroid injection due to an increased risk of bleeding into the joint or tissue at the injection site.

You should notify the clinician that is treating you of any regular medications which you are taking.

Are there alternative treatment choices to steroid injections?

There are a number of oral medications which can be taken for joint pain and soft tissue inflammation, physiotherapy is a further alternative treatment to managing joint pain and soft tissue inflammation.

View procedure prices   Make an enquiry   or call us on: 01206 987525